Saluting Britishness

In Scotland we know the score. This brand of neo-Nazi, white supremacist, British ethno-nationalism – complete with the Sieg Heil salute – has already hit the streets. It has been mobilised all over Scotland against the civic and voluntary nationalism of the independence movement. On the 19 September 2014 it was on full triumphalist show to mark its territory on George Square, Glasgow, and it has been visible at every single pro-union demonstration and counterdemonstration since.

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Sky News Poll: A Crash in Slow Motion

It was as clear as day why the Scottish First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon, and the youngest Westminster MP Mhairi Black were on the list. As prominent female members of the Scottish National Party – the party that threatens to tear Britain asunder – their intended function was to lose and so furnish the media with yet another handy stick with which to beat Scotland and the SNP.

Britain’s Most Influential Women

The internet however, as Sky News has been reminded, is a bit of a swine. Readers in Scotland clocked what was going on and sounded the alarm on social media. Over the weekend Twitter and Facebook did what they do best, and folk all over Scotland rallied behind their favourite people. From their place of obscurity they quickly shot to the summit, with Scots voting in their tens of thousands and sharing the news to the furthest reaches of the internet. By Sunday afternoon supporters in Wales, across parts of England, and all over the island of Ireland were joining in.

Hating the Irish: Brexit and England’s Hatred of Ireland

True to form, having been bested by an Irishman and having run out of any other rational arguments – well, he never had one in the first place – Boulton came clean out of his foxhole to respond to the derision he was getting in Ireland. “You Irish,” he spat back, “need to get over yourselves.” You Irish! We all speak the same language. We know what that “You [insert ethnic group]” means. In just two words Adam Boulton had typed out a concise summation of over six hundred years of England’s anti-Irish hatred.